PLUMBING INSPECTIONS

Plumbing Supply, Distribution Systems and Fixtures

We inspect the main water supply shut-off valve, the main fuel supply shut-off valve, interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water.
Plumbing may be defined as the practice, materials and fixtures used in the installation, maintenance and alteration of all piping, fixtures, appliances and appurtenances in connection with sanitary and storm drainage facilities, the venting system, and public and private water supply systems.

Drains, Wastes & Vents

We inspect all toilets for proper operation by flushing, sinks, tubs, Hydro-Massage Therapy Equipment and showers for functional drainage, waste, vent system; and drainage sump pumps with accessible floats.
The water supply brought into the house and used is discharged through the drainage system. This system is either a sanitary drainage system carrying just interior waste water or a combined system carrying interior waste and roof runoff. All branch drains must join the house drain with a “Y” -type fitting. The same is true for fixture drains joining branch drains. The “Y” fitting is used to eliminate, as much as possible, the deposit of solids in or near the connection. A build-up of these solids will cause a blockage in the drain.

Water Heating Equipment

We inspect the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing.
Temperature/pressure-relief or TPR valves are safety devices installed on water heating appliances, such as boilers and domestic water supply heaters. TPRs are designed to automatically release water in the event that pressure or temperature in the water tank exceeds safe levels.
If temperature sensors and safety devices such as TPRs malfunction, water in the system may become superheated (exceed the boiling point). Once the tank ruptures and water is exposed to the atmosphere, it will expand into steam almost instantly and occupy approximately 1,600 times its original volume. This process can propel a heating tank like a rocket through multiple floors, causing personal injury and extensive property damage.
Hot and Cold-Water Main Lines: The hot and cold-water main lines are usually hung from the basement ceiling and are attached to the water meter and hot-water tank on one side and the fixture supply risers on the other. These pipes should be installed in a neat manner and should be supported by pipe hangers or straps of sufficient strength and number to prevent sagging. Hot and cold-water lines should be approximately 6 inches apart unless the hot water line is insulated. This is to ensure that the cold-water line does not pick up heat from the hot water line